OMNIADVERSUS Self-Actualising the Subject

“OMNIADVERSUS Self-Actualising the Subject,” or “O,” is a theoretical, visual, and performative art research project that has been developed since 2010. It is an ongoing piece that undertakes artistic research on post-identity through heteronomy, the formation of artistic subjecthoods, the interdependence between subject and object as artistic values in non-art approaches. O proposes a revision of the question of authorship through a conceptual and immersive practice and inquires about the functionalities of the self in art politics.

O is a rhizosphere-like platform that revives concepts that are put to an experimental performative practice. It explores these concepts to an empiric extent, setting its research to analyse and develop knowledge over the aftermaths of such experiences. Its formulation has been influenced by ubiquitous concepts in philosophy and in critical theory and by a subsistential affinity encountered with Mille Plateaux. These are undertaken as playful elements for research, with ultimate considerations in self-overcoming, becoming-other, metamorphosis of the being, schizoanalysis and schizophrenic practices, the existential nomadic, multiplicity, and impersonality.

O’s practice happens through an immersive performance with existential contours, consisting of launching several artist-personae, or immersive heteronyms, that develop distinct lines of investigation resulting in individual bodies of work, by inducing the manifestation of agencements, practising deterritorialisation, and evolving through becoming-other.

The heteronyms, are integrated in particular cultural and social backgrounds and interact in specific circuits, describing their existence as living personae. Evolving in an autonomous way and independent of one another, they create different artistic approaches, as by-product multiplicities surging within the context of immersion. Promoting insights into the overcoming of the self through multiple-subject approaches, O aims to cast the self as the art piece, ungraspable, within several prisms and cultural influences. This is in accordance with the identity forming process of subjectivation, which the heteronyms relate to in the field of visual and performing arts.

These heteronyms are impersonated by a sole person who temporarily disengages from using her official, familiar identity and sets off on a post-identity journey, immersing herself in a field of action with other identity attributes (such as name, origin, generation, gender), allowing these to become tinted by the circumstantial contact in the cultural-social environment they are immersed in. This self-approved allowance for frequent identity shifting according to an external leverage strives to recreate and actualise the concept of identity as an ever-changing interfacial embedding of the self, as a medium for self-overcoming, beyond arborescent compliances.

The launching of the heteronyms’ personalities allows for observations about the formation of identity in a bid to transgress its own officialised restrictions.

O enables practices toward an ultimate merging of subject and object, as a formula for retrieving significance ahead of dualism, impoverishing the fields of stage/wall representation.

O encourages processes of becoming, immanence acts as the subject emerges as an artistic object in unexpected existential formats, as in life itself, sustaining non-art statements.It conceives trajectories of life as the artistic object per se, living-as-form, with their inevitable processes of deconstruction/reconstruction unveiling the possibility of “being-zero” as an excellent source of the art medium.

The authorship of OMNIADVERSUS is presented sous rature due to the reasons explained above which defend the impersonality of the author; thus it should always be presented in this way: Silvia Pereira.

Re-Notations III: Schumann’s Kreisleriana, I Molto Agitato

What is a score? What is notation? What is the function of notation? These ontological questions assume that we can capture some essence of a particular thing. But essences can transform and thus we have to dismiss the concept of essence, or transform it with difference à la Deleuze. The answer to such questions is therefore an invitation to experiment with transformations.

If we say that a score under normal circumstances has the potential to release a certain sound world through the engagement of performers, then we must say that the Re-notations project does not release an audible world but a visual world of patterns through the engagement of particular diagrammatic relations. Thus, notation has been transformed in the sense of direction, aim, and function. The notation employed by the Re-notations project does not aim for performance and sonification, rather it contemplates the materiality of performance; it looks back on a particular musical situation, a specific musical location, and fuses time and spatial elements. Is it still notation? “Is” is the wrong word. This way of looking (notating) is both deterritorialisational and reterritorialisational. By extracting the specific stratum of the musical situation in question and replacing/releasing it into another notational context, the “music” or certain music forces escape for a moment and we experience the interplay of deterritorialisation and reterritorialisation (both of notation itself and the music being notated). At the same time—the multidimensional potential of music is intensified—music is always becoming (even the classics).

Re-notations is a project/machine that re-notates classical piano masterpieces from a specific angle and with an entirely different aim from the original. It is notation that folds itself onto other notations, other scores, other musics, examining their signifier–signified relations with materiality. Re-notations are always in-between, they do not have their own music; they relate, they repeat, they allow escape. Re-notations focus on the materiality and physical context of the works examined and give us a specific perspective on music, a perspective that maps out the activity in space and time of the physical materials involved: hands and fingers on specific locations on the piano keyboard. Through this, the intensity and density of the involved activity is revealed as an overcrowded space of movements.

A pattern emerges, but not from design or from an author but from a specific diagrammatic relation. Music seen from this perspective is constantly occupying the same locations where actions keep folding one another, repeating differences. A performance of spatio-temporal multiplicity is disclosed. Each keystroke (depression) is accounted for as a link between a spatial location on the keyboard and a temporal axis. Exhausted location, excessive quantity, superimpositions, and interpenetration become the subject of this notational act where the relationship between hands and keyboards, time and materiality, are put to the foreground. The “score” is becoming an abstract, virtual, diagrammatic “recording” of the physical and material situation the music demands: a limited number of space-points are occupied and activated in specific temporal order. This order becomes obscure within a multiplicity of condensed locations. This is the escape of a clandestine stratum of a musical multiplicity (a slice). Thus, notation reverses or diversifies its direction and becomes an active post-performance activity, not instructional, not authoritative, but speculative, reflective, and itself performative.