Schizoproduction and Artistic Research

In my artistic research for my PhD at the Theatre Academy in the University of Arts, Helsinki, I have used the metamodel of schizoanalysis both in creating artistic works and in pedagogical contexts. Recently I have run extensive workshops around the topic “What is Real?” in the Theaterdiscounter in Berlin and MoKS artists’ centre in Mooste, Estonia, with the performance artist Karolina Kucia. Beside this, we both have been working with the Ueinzz theatre group from São Paulo, directed by the philosopher Peter Pál Pelbart and psychotherapist Ana Carmen, whose practice is focused on schizoanalysis in experimental theatre practice.

The basis for this presentation is the theoretical background of schizoanalysis and practical findings on how it functions as a dynamic tool in creating materials both for artistic production and for how one perceives subjectivity in relation to the group, milieu, social norms, or political bodies. Schizoanalysis is a tool for comprehending how “the real” is being constituted as lived territory through machinic modulation of the flux and in regard to virtual universes of reference. However, my intention is to contrast schizoanalysis as a “system of a systems,” or as the world in relation foreclosed real. These are two aspects that are intertwined in my artistic research: heterogenesis of subjectivity in contrast with the one, not as substance but as unforeseeable void—or, in other terms, the transcendental system of schizoanalysis with the radical immanence of the real.

Schizoanalysis functions as a dynamic tool for meta-modelling the world as being produced by “immanent capitalism.” In groups and individual practice, I’ve used schizoanalysis as a tool to trace processes as philosophy: how certain machinic conjunctions in relation with the flux produces a particular existential territory with the universal reference, how some machinic conjunctions may create new “lines of flight,” and why some others retract to habitual refrains of subjugation. However, in my research I have encountered troubles comprehending the real through the particular system of meta-modelisation. It may seem only to be a horizon, an exterior, or the virtual universal reference. What it does is both analyse and produce relations, exchanges, and conjunctions. The real is being assigned to the asignified territory of the unconscious.

Following the critique of these philosophical concepts by François Laruelle, my attempt is to contrast this philosophical form of thought with the proposition that subjectivity has only unilateral relation with the real. The world is being modelled by schizoanalysis propagating new forms of existential territories or retraction to ossified refrains. The world does not equate with the real, which is separated without separation. In the case of performance art, in this non-correlation with capitalism as philosophy, the foreclosure can be found in body. Not body as severalty, but as “one” body. A body is not only part of the assemblage but also foreclosed real. It is both machinic production and foreclosed indifference as the void. Still, it is only through the heterogenesis or modulation, where the comprehension of the philosophy of capitalism may be regarded as hallucination, that the world is not conflated with the real. Where the process of artistic practice is a process of stitching and ripping apart, probing for lines of flight to create consistency, the practice has only a non-relation with the foreclosed carnality of the body and the unprecedented real.

This presentation includes materials that published in the book Tero Nahua, Heresy and Provocation (Malmö: Förlaget 2015) to be presented at the Mad House event in Helsinki on 19 November 2015.

Variables, Diagrams, Process

The characteristic of a musical time-space, whether sound is the result of material sources or generated by machines, is to give consistency to previously unheard sound individuations—without identity (Deleuze 2003). To this end, mapping and spatial-temporal diagrams determine the variables’ changes and the modelling of dynamic events—following either a gestural or techno-generated process. Far from excluding each other, the complementary poles of the continuous and discontinuous are in constant exchange while becoming fields, varying their dimensions and distributions, renewing the composition of their relations in variable, gradual, and imperceptible transformations, speeds, and density changes (Criton 2015).

Transitivity, more than stable continuities, retains our interest here, setting contiguity of different sizes (smooth/striated), indiscernible areas, and dazzling couplings that allow linear, exclusive, or restrictive models to be abandoned and be moved from one category or “middle” to another (Criton 2011).

The presentation will outline a few transitive situations—sensory, gestural, spatial continuities. Through Chaoscaccia for cello (2013) and Circle Process for violin (2012), the presentation will focus on performance and gestural processes, pushing the dramaturgy of gesture to its event size, in order to grasp its driving idea and to identify its principle, both processually and extensively. What will enable affects to gain speed and direction, and introduce dynamic, intensive, and extensive associations? Through Plis (2008) and Ecoutes croisées (2014), the possibilities of ubiquitous (Criton 2012) and multimodal listening (Criton 2014) will be discussed.

Chaoscaccia (Criton and Walker 2013) follows a gesture process to explore a scordatura in 1/16th tone on the cello. The route is determined by a gesture map and consists of five steps: (1) rebounds, (2) parlando, (3) multiphonies, (4) mutando, and (5) disappearing. The basic principle is concerned with instability and sudden changes (shift process) between different states. Each state proceeds in an unstable mode and emerges without a forced beginning or ending. The duration of the cycle is open and it can be played in a concise or extensive manner. The cello is sonorised with two microphones (on foot), which can be directional or cardioid (type Neumann 184). 

References

Criton, Pascale. 2011. “Nothing is Established Forever.” In The Guattari Effect, edited by Éric Alliez and Andrew Goffey, 235–50. London: Continuum.

—. 2012. “O ouvido ubiquista: Escutar diferentemente.” In Cadernos de subjetividade, edited by Peter Pál Pelbart. São Paulo, Brazil: University Catholic Pontificale of São Paulo.

—. 2014. “Listening Otherwise: Playing with Sound Vibrations.” In ICMC Proceedings 2014. Accessed 12 October 2015. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/p/pod/dod-idx/listening-otherwise-playing-with-sound-vibration.pdf?c=icmc;idno=bbp2372.2014.275.

—. 2015. “L’hétérogénèse sonore.” In Gilles Deleuze: La pensée-musique, edited by Pascale Criton and Jean-Marc Chouvel. Paris: CDMC, Symétrie.

Criton, Pascale, and Deborah Walker. 2013. Chaoscaccia for cello tuned in 1/16th tone (duration circa 20 min.). 

Deleuze, Gilles. 2003. “‘Rendre audibles des forces non-audibles par elles-mêmes.’ Le temps musical, Ircam 1978.” In Deux régimes de fous. Textes et entretiens, 1975–1995, edited by David Lapoujade. Paris: Editions de Minuit.