Chaosmic Nuptials: The Secret Language of Mondrian’s Jazz

Runette Kruger

conference: DARE 2017: aberrant nuptials
date: November 22, 2017
venue: Orpheus Institute, Auditorium
format: in words
practice: image
keywords: chaosmos, colour, Franz Kafka, haecceity, jazz, milieu

abstract about the author(s)

abstract

In A Thousand Plateaus, the work of abstract painter Piet Mondrian is mentioned three times. The work and thought of Kafka, on the other hand, forms an unbroken refrain throughout the text, and for Deleuze and Guattari “No one is better than Kafka at differentiating the two axes of the assemblage and making them function together.” However, it is possible to contend that A Thousand Plateaus is an extended play of variables referring pre-eminently to Mondrian, as a constant variable, and that to read the book is to hear Mondrian, so that as a point of departure here the statement becomes “No one is better than Kafka Mondrian at differentiating the two axes of the assemblage and making them function together.” How does this work?

Listening to the diagonal in Mondrian’s work (which is never there), makes it possible to discern that he is painting something else—the trace(r) of a “plurality of straight lines”; the intersection of sound and non-sound (which is neither sound nor silence); or “absolute speed.” Absolute speed can be found in a jazz club/time machine (“Everything in the bar moves and at the same time is at rest”), which decimates time not by travelling but by staying where it is: a time-space vector, a bit of time in its pure state approaching the superlinear system of music—a haecceity. In the mode of “new music,” Mondrian’s works depict a future event that has already transpired, but what will it be?

This paper/riff uses A Thousand Plateaus and Dialogues II to map Mondrian’s secret language, to deterritorialise the paintings (or rather to hear the deterritorialisations already at work in the work), by following as many lines of flight as possible to their infinite dimensions in and beyond the canvases. Thus, while it is possible to construe Mondrian’s abstract compositions as rigid utopias or as othering grids, invoking the line of death and abolition (as I have done elsewhere), a proximal listening to the compositions reveals hidden forces in the works—their true power. The artist stealthily uses the language of binaries (non-sound/sound, non-colour/colour, male/female, abstract/concrete, culture/ nature) to create a nuptial assemblage, so that when he invokes “the new music,” he does so with the nuptial line of flight in mind, combining binaries in a double capture—neither the same neutralising and eradicating the other, nor “opposites” merely “coupled.” The concrete-abstractions, as Mondrian refers to them, are hence interpreted here as painted jazz, audible compositions in a time-space zone of indeterminacy that hosts aberrant nuptials across n vectors of “binaries.” The geometric canvases arrive fast and slow as nodes of becoming, functioning as the milieus for a swarm of becomings, or chaosmos. This writing is hence an attempt to sound the artist’s secret language, to make the book machine/s of Deleuze and Guattari form a bloc with the war machine of Mondrian’s compositions somewhere outside and between the perpendicular.

about the author(s)

Runette Kruger

Runette Kruger is Head of the Department of Fine and Applied Arts at the Tshwane University of Technology. She teaches art theory and supervises postgraduate candidates. She has published a number of articles and has delivered papers at national and international conferences. She recently completed a PhD in visual studies at the University of Pretoria for which she devised an agentic and dissident utopia, incorporating aspects of the work of Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, Louis Marin, Michel de Certeau, and Homi K Bhabha. Her research interests include Dutch art, time, space, utopia, newness, cities, globalisation, agency, and dissent.

info & contact

affiliation

Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, ZA

email

krugerr [AT] tut.ac.za

web

orcid.org